Planning For Those Who Aren’t Prepared

Scroll down for the posts dealing with the possibility of war especially with Russia.  Here is a portion of a post by Adam Taggart via PeakProsperity.com, . Humans haven’t changed all that much really as you will see in the yutube video below.
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Grasshopper Nation: Planning For Those Who Aren’t Prepared

How Will The Unprepared React?

So — lots of reasons to expect the vast majority of the population to be vulnerable to coming crises both large and small. When the next calamity strikes, how will these people likely react?

History gives us plenty of examples to answer this with confidence: Not well.

When resources per capita drop below a certain level on Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs, civility is thrown aside. Desperate people act desperately.

We’ve heard examples of this from past podcast guests like Fernando “FerFAL”Aguille, who lived through several economic collapses in South America.

Closer to home, it took less than 24 hours for stores shelves to be emptied andfights to break out over water after a water main broke in Weston, MA, a suburb of Boston, in 2010.

But perhaps this episode from the Twilight Zone best captures the jettisoning of social mores in the face of unexpected crisis.

Filmed during the Cold War, this short episode captivatingly dramatizes how quickly our social fabric can rip apart when unexpected threats arise. Specifically, it shows how the unprepared are likely to turn to — and then, on — those who did take precautions:

It’s worth taking the time to watch this episode. It really hits home the importance of having extra supplies on hand for the inevitable ‘unprepareds’ banging on your door should a disaster arrive.

And it raises the critical questions:

  • Of the people in your life, which ones will you put aside reserve resources for?
  • How much are you willing to put aside for them?
  • And, what are your limits? At what point will you say “no”?

Preparing For The Unprepared

Our resources are finite. Most of us don’t feel we have all that we require to meet our own needs and goals. And the best-laid preparations of the most planful of us can suddenly become woefully insufficient if too many unexpected family, friends and neighbors show up demanding our charity.

How do we prepare for the unprepared?

The short answer is we can’t; not fully. But we can plan for how much to place in reserve for them.

Here at PeakProsperity.com, we firmly believe in helping others; even those who scoff today at our “doomer” approach of preparing for the worst. But we realize that the demand from the unprepared masses during a crisis will most likely always dwarf your resources. So you’ll have to make tough calls. Our advice is to make them now. Whom will you help? What are you willing to provide them with?

Making those choices is heartbreaking. But making them now allows you — as well as your loved ones — to better prepare today by setting expectations and creating specific goals.

Here’s our advice for those of you wrestling with this thorny task:

  • Put your oxygen mask on first — You can only be a help to others if you’re first in a position to do so. It all starts with building resilience; reducing your vulnerability to the highest likelihood threats able to impact your lifestyle the most (job loss, market crash, sustained power outage, natural disaster, health issue, etc). Our book Prosper!: How to Prepare for the Future and Create a World Worth Inhering was created as a manual for doing exactly this. And its companion What Should I Do? Guideprovides step-by-step guidance for a making your preparatons (be sure to start with Step 0)
  • Serve as a model — Let your actions be visible as an inspiration to others. Allow them to see that preparing for the unexpected isn’t just for the “tin foil hat” crowd. Emergency preparedness investments like stored food and water don’t need to break the bank, can be made over time, and can involve the entire community in activity that brings it closer together. Building Social Capital, improving your health and fitness, learning new skills, becoming more energy efficient, learning to strengthen your emotional health and those you care about — all of these are life-enhancing pursuits.
  • Keep your reserve assets confidential — Don’t make ALL of your preparations known. As the above section shows, desperate people take desperate action. The best way to guard against folks coming to take your most precious assets is for no one to know they exist. Beyond that, it often helps to have protective measures in place. Our Personal Safety & Home Defense Guide is full of advice on how to reduce your exposure to the most prevalent forms of invasion and attack.
  • Build awareness among friends/family of the risks in play —  Forewarned is forearmed. Our video series The Crash Course was created to build awareness of the macro risks we face today, and to explain them in an intuitive, approachable way to people of all backgrounds. Sharing that series (or the more condensed 1-hour Accelerated Crash Course) is an excellent way to open eyes and minds to the need for prudent action today. Again, use our What Should I Do? Guide as a catalyst for helping those who ‘get it’ take their first steps.
  • Get folks engaged in the right actions for the wrong reasons —  So your buddy next door doesn’t want to hear about your “doomer” predictions? Try a different tact. Maybe he likes the idea of a neighborhood fall cider pressing party, and joins you in planting a few apple trees in each of your backyards. Our Community Building guide is full of ideas for engaging your neighbors in action in ways that make your community more resilient, even if they don’t realize it through the fun they’re having.
  • Define your line — Let those whose welfare you’re taking into consideration know of your intentions. Don’t make it a guarantee; just let them know their security is important to you. But let them know now what the limits of your support will be — or even better, give them a more restricted version (which will leave you some buffer in case of the unexpected). Setting these expectations in advance is valuable, even if the folks you’re talking to aren’t really listening. At the very least, you can proceed knowing you’ve done your utmost to be up front about what they can and can’t count on you for. Review our guide on Emotional Resilience; you will very well need it to prepare your heart in case you ever do have to put these tough calls into action.
  • Empower the latecomers — Invest in assets and agreements that enable late-arrivals to help themselves (tools, information/education, small jobs, etc). Helping people skill-up and provide for themselves both increases their ability to prosper and reduces the likelihood they drain your finite stores. And you’ll be perceived as a benefactor within your community, which will be motivated to provide for and protect you (rather than abandon you) during times of adversity.

There’s no doubt this is a thorny subject, with imperfect answers. But to fail to plan for the needs of the unprepared is, in itself, a plan to fail. After all: it’s a grasshopper nation, and we ants are too few.

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One thought on “Planning For Those Who Aren’t Prepared”

  1. That’s a good article, but there is no way you can prepare for every possible scenario. Doing some things just make sense, even when there is no threat foreseen on the horizon. A friend of mine gave me some really good advice some years ago when I was just starting out as a young adult who trusted in the Lord – “Do the best you can and then don’t worry about it. You are taken care of.” He didn’t say don’t prepare or plan, but he did say “do your best.”

    I guess the understanding that comes with that statement, is that one needs faith in the Lord from the start, or nothing done really matters.

    Liked by 1 person

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